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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Old Norse

4 minutes

Using street art to bring Regency warriors to an ancient Viking landscape

Vardø in Norway feels like a town forgotten by time. Its colourful houses stand in an overgrown field of weeds, overlooking a bay where the seagulls outnumber the people. For the Irish-born artist Conor Harrington, this town is both an inspiration and a canvas. Painting the walls of its abandoned, crumbling buildings, he applies the techniques of graffiti art to images inspired by the Old Masters, bringing a modern aesthetic to a timeless place. In Old Norse, the UK filmmaker Andrew Telling follows Harrington through Vardø, documenting his artistic process, and the landscape that inspires it.

Director: Andrew Telling

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison

Essay/Music
Music is not for ears

We never just hear music. Our experience of it is saturated in cultural expectations, personal memory and the need to move

Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis