Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Epigenome: the symphony in your cells

5 minutes

Could we harness epigenomics to become master DNA conductors?

Our cells perform an amazingly vast variety of tasks within our body, from the brain cells that transfer the electronic impulses related to thoughts, to the white blood cells that wage war on harmful foreign intruders. Perhaps even more remarkable, almost all of our cells are different interpretations of the same exact code: our unique DNA sequence. Using musicians and conductors interpreting a score as a metaphor, Epigenome: The Symphony in Your Cells explains how cells reading from the same code are able perform distinct functions, and how chemicals can alter these functions over time.

Director: Thom Hoffman

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Biology
The minds of plants

From the memories of flowers to the sociability of trees, the cognitive capacities of our vegetal cousins are all around us

Laura Ruggles

Essay/Earth Science
Life goes deeper

The Earth is not a solid mass of rock: its hot, dark, fractured subsurface is home to weird and wonderful life forms

Gaetan Borgonie & Maggie Lau