ORIGINAL

War, crime and punishment

6 minutes

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

Historically, soldiers have been subject to a different set of standards, laws and punishments than civilians, on the assumption that war is an exceptional circumstance. But should soldiers really be treated differently by the law? Because combatant and civilian criminals often face similar pressures and circumstances, the Oxford-based French political philosopher Cécile Fabre believes that there should be no ethical chasm between how society prosecutes ‘acts of unjust aggression’, whether in peacetime or in war. A thought-provoking perspective on justice, this instalment of Aeon’s In Sight series offers a striking argument for changing how the law sees war in the 21st century.

Producer: Kellen Quinn

Interviewer: Nigel Warburton

Editor: Adam D’Arpino

Assistant Editor: Alyssa Pagano

Video/Music

Melody, rhythm and piety: the rich forms and meanings of Indian classical music

17 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Values & Beliefs

Why we need to move empathy from personal emotion to collective moral concern

5 minutes

Video/Childhood & Adolescence

Why the ‘exotic and strange’ world of childhood is ripe for horror

5 minutes

Video/Nature & Environment

A Herculean fish and the fight against a $6 billion mega-dam project in Alaska

25 minutes

Essay/Family Life

How to be a patriarch

His duties are many, his challenges weighty, but his glory can be great. A guide to family management, by a Roman nobleman

Marcus Sidonius Falx & Jerry Toner

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Idea/Poverty & Development

Want to reduce drug use? Listen to women drug users

Kasia Malinowska & Bethany Medley

Video/Fairness & Equality

How the one-child policy created a Chinese underclass of 13 million people with no rights

15 minutes

Essay/Education

Child’s play

The authoritative statement of scientific method derives from a surprising place — early 20th-century child psychology

Henry Cowles

Idea/Politics & Government

Sovereignty can be bought and sold like a commodity

Steven Press