EXCLUSIVE

Walter Potter: the man who married kittens

19 minutes

Long before internet posts of cute animals, there were Victorian taxidermy tableaux

Born in the English village of Bramber in 1835, the Victorian-era taxidermist Walter Potter created a collection of anthropomorphic dioramas that continued to attract thousands of visitors until it was controversially dispersed at auction in 2003. His intricately detailed scenes of stuffed little animals frozen in distinctly human situations – kittens at a wedding, frogs in a playground, rabbits in a classroom – tend to be dismissed as creepy or kitsch by the art establishment. But that attitude is resented as snobbery by Potter collectors, who argue that his curious creations are inspired Victorian artifacts worthy of veneration and preservation. A portrait both of popular entertainment from a bygone age and of those who prize it as art, Walter Potter: The Man Who Married Kittens was commissioned by Brooklyn’s Morbid Anatomy Museum and played at the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival.

Director: Ronni Thomas

Producer: Joanna Ebenstein

Executive Producers: Tonya Hurley, Tracy Hurley Martin

Editor: Will Ellis

Photographer: Robert Carnevale

Composer: Stephen Coates

Website: Morbid Anatomy Museum

Video/Art

Born of pain, filled with power – a teenage girl’s art that confronts in order to heal

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Knowledge

Teaching philosophy at school isn’t just good pedagogy – it helps to safeguard society

5 minutes

Video/History

Albania built 750,000 bunkers for a war that never came. Now what?

24 minutes

Essay/Stories & Literature

The truth about tarot

Whether divining ancient wisdoms or elevating the art of cold reading, tarot is a form of therapy, much like psychoanalysis

James McConnachie

Video/Subcultures

Deep faith and rough rides – life at an evangelical rodeo Bible camp

23 minutes

Idea/Cultures & Languages

Stuck on one idea of truth or beauty? Rhizomes can help

Nicholas Tampio

Essay/Stories & Literature

Sands of time

The North Sea is rich in signs of what made the modern world. It's also a monument to what awaits us in the Anthropocene

David Farrier

ORIGINAL
Video/Film & Television

Why do we crave the awful futures of apocalyptic fiction?

5 minutes

Idea/Rituals & Celebrations

How to get your kicks in the hermit kingdom of North Korea

Laya Maheshwari