Herbs and empires: a brief history of malaria drugs

3 minutes

Our fight against malaria is strange, cyclical and shows few signs of slowing

By far the deadliest parasitic disease in human history, malaria has killed millions upon millions of people over the past several thousand years. Effective anti-malarial treatments have existed since the 17th century, but the disease still kills more than a million people a year, many of them children. Despite enormous efforts to neutralise and eradicate the disease, the malaria parasite has proved hugely resilient, capable of developing a resistance to everything humankind has ever thrown at it. Produced by NPR, Herbs and Empires traces the strange history of one of our most formidable foes.

Producer: Adam Cole, Ben de la Cruz

Video/Art

Born of pain, filled with power – a teenage girl’s art that confronts in order to heal

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Metaphysics

Stephanie regrets passing up a great opportunity. Can modal realism help?

5 minutes

Video/History

Albania built 750,000 bunkers for a war that never came. Now what?

24 minutes

Idea/Medicine

We need ecstasy and opioids in place of Prozac and Xanax

Marc Lewis & Shaun Shelly

Video/Illness & Disease

How our bodies can create billions of defences against disease with just 20,000 genes

3 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Medical Ethics

Intersex rights

Children born with in-between sex development are subject to surgeries that many believe violate their human rights

Alice Dreger

Idea/Medical Research

Lifestyle changes, not a magic pill, can reverse Alzheimer’s

Clayton Dalton

Essay/Gender

Who is a sportswoman?

Elite female athletes are subjected to invasive gender tests, and hormone treatments if they fail. This is deeply unfair

Silvia Camporesi

Video/Illness & Disease

The restless rhythms of being a teenager with an incurable illness

12 minutes