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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Six photographs: René Burri

11 minutes

René Burri on a career of turning evanescent moments into indelible photographs

Since the advent of photography, capturing fleeting occurrences, glances and glimpses has become ever more commonplace. The prominent Swiss photographer René Burri, who died in October 2014 at the age of 81, specialised in those ephemeral moments, which he aimed to catch ‘like a fly in flight’. Burri had a way of seeing that allowed him to find the otherwise unseen moments of life, a gift that he explained, in simpler terms, as showing what the world looked like. In this film, the late photographer discusses six of his most famous works.

Director: Anthony Austin

Producer: Helena Reis

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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Essay/Music
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