Roman army structure

3 minutes

‘Semper paratus’ – how the organisation of the Roman army made it always ready for war

We find that the Romans owed the conquest of the world to no other cause than continual military training, exact observance of discipline in their camps, and unwearied cultivation of the other arts of war.
– Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus, Roman military historian of the late fourth century

At the height of its military might, the Roman empire was nothing if not prepared for battle, structuring its armies with mathematical precision that might astound even the most assiduous modern bureaucrat. Originally produced for an exhibition at the Vindolanda Museum in the north of England, this short video stylishly explores the structure of ancient Roman armies, including how non-citizens could secure full citizenship for themselves and their lineage through 25 years of honourable military service (if they made it that long, of course).

Video by ISO Design

Video/Childhood & Adolescence

What to make of a Riot Grrrl? A snapshot of feminism and high school in the 1990s

18 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Values & Beliefs

Why we need to move empathy from personal emotion to collective moral concern

5 minutes

Video/Demography & Migration

Amid massive urbanisation and modernisation, rural Japan persists in idiosyncratic corners

30 minutes

Essay/History

Agony in the agora

Democracy, by nature, is a contest between clashing political desires. That is why the public square matters so much

Saul Frampton

Idea/History

Populism now divides, yet once it united the working class

Adrienne Petty

Video/Demography & Migration

Painted frame by frame, a vivid animation restores a history lost to deportation

6 minutes

Essay/Work

The quitting economy

When employees are treated as short-term assets, they reinvent themselves as marketable goods, always ready to quit

Ilana Gershon

Video/Progress & Modernity

Two young Bushmen grapple with the possibility of transitioning to modern lives

29 minutes

Idea/Politics & Government

Moderation may be the most challenging and rewarding virtue

Aurelian Craiutu