The ministry of the stove

5 minutes

Take the Five

3 minutes

EXCLUSIVE

Sundays with Riki

19 minutes

Random events

31 minutes

Las del diente

5 minutes

Aeon for Friends

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Silent worship in a Quaker meeting house where only the fire in the stove is heard

The Quakers have historically worshipped outdoors or in public buildings and meeting houses, believing that God is in all people and places. Their meeting houses, also known as friends houses – simple structures that sprung up across the eastern United States as Quakers grew in numbers during the 18th and 19th centuries – are granted no special religious significance, and no sacred rituals are performed within them. They simply provide a sanctuary where Quakers can meet and worship in silence, speaking only occasionally when they believe the Holy Spirit has moved them to do so. Bringing us into the South Starksboro Friends Meeting House in Vermont, which has been used for worship since it was built in 1828, The Ministry of the Stove immerses us in this experience of silence punctuated only by the sounds of a crackling fire.

Photographer and Editor: Finn Yarbrough

Co-director: Katherine Yarbrough

Website: Earth House Productions

Aeon for Friends

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Chase rolling hills and windmills on a jazzy ride through the California countryside

Interstate 5, the primary highway on the West Coast of the United States, runs for more than 1,000 miles between Mexico and Canada, through California, Oregon and Washington. In this experimental short film, the US filmmaker Conner Griffith takes the Californian stretches of the highway, and flips, spins, intercuts and speeds them up to exhilarating effect, set to a vigorous rendition of Take the ‘A’ Train, performed by the US jazz pianist Richard Tee. The video cleverly juxtaposes quintessentially East Coast urban music with West Coast rural imagery but, more than anything, it’s a wildly fun ride.

Video by Conner Griffith

Score: Richard Tee – Take the A Train

Aeon for Friends

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‘You wanna get rid of me?’ When the time comes to move mom into assisted living

During their weekly Sunday breakfast together, Ivy discovers that her octogenarian mother Riki is losing her memory. Soon after, Ivy decides that Riki would be better off moving out of the cozy Brooklyn apartment where she lives alone, and into an assisted living community in the Bronx, closer to Ivy’s own home. But, of course, when it comes to big family decisions, nothing is ever quite that easy. Ivy is making the request out of love, but Riki – resistant every step of the way – thinks her daughter is being controlling. When the time for a trial run at the community arrives, Ivy’s siblings start to question whether the move is premature, while Riki’s neighbours suggest that she’ll never be back. These delicate interpersonal dynamics are skilfully explored in this short documentary by New York-based filmmaker Brandon Barr. A tender and intimate portrait of ageing and the complexities of familial love, Sundays with Riki is likely to resonate with anyone who has helped to care for – or just cares about – an elderly relative.

Director: Brandon Barr

Producer: Max Mooney

Colourist: Anthony Riso

Aeon for Friends

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A classic film finds order in randomness with the aid of some improbably elaborate sets

The Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) was formed in 1956 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with the mission to create science-education materials for US high-school classrooms. In this PSSC film from 1961, the physics professors J N Patterson Hume and Donald Ivey of the University of Toronto deploy their expertise – as well as some seriously elaborate sets – to demonstrate how, with enough data, highly predictable patterns can emerge from unpredictable events. This version of Random Events has been visually and aurally enhanced by the Aeon Video team. For more elaborate educational wizardry from the PSSC, watch Frames of Reference.

Director: John Friedman

Visual restoration: Tamur Qutab

Audio restoration: Adam D’Arpino

Aeon for Friends

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A magical mystery trip through the complex connections in women’s bodies

‘Girls are weird. Babies are weird. Bodies are extra weird,’ says the Spanish animator Ana Pérez López. In Las del Diente, she uses excerpts from candid conversations with three women as a canvas for a refreshingly honest and unapologetic meditation on modern womanhood. The anecdotes are enriched with hallucinatory animated sequences and percussive interludes, transforming their conversations about social pressure and biological anomalies into a surreal celebration of being female, in all its multitudes – from having your body treated like a business to contending with deeply conflicted feelings about having children.

Aeon for Friends

Find out more

Silent worship in a Quaker meeting house where only the fire in the stove is heard

The Quakers have historically worshipped outdoors or in public buildings and meeting houses, believing that God is in all people and places. Their meeting houses, also known as friends houses – simple structures that sprung up across the eastern United States as Quakers grew in numbers during the 18th and 19th centuries – are granted no special religious significance, and no sacred rituals are performed within them. They simply provide a sanctuary where Quakers can meet and worship in silence, speaking only occasionally when they believe the Holy Spirit has moved them to do so. Bringing us into the South Starksboro Friends Meeting House in Vermont, which has been used for worship since it was built in 1828, The Ministry of the Stove immerses us in this experience of silence punctuated only by the sounds of a crackling fire.

Photographer and Editor: Finn Yarbrough

Co-director: Katherine Yarbrough

Website: Earth House Productions

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