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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Chuck Jones: the evolution of an artist

9 minutes

The inventive absurdity of Chuck Jones, creator of ‘Looney Tunes’

Even if you’ve never heard the name, you’re almost certainly familiar with the work of Chuck Jones. Between 1938 and 1962, Jones directed around 200 cartoons for Warner Brothers – including numerous episodes of Looney Tunes – and, in the process, developed some of the most famous animated characters ever created. Part of the US filmmaker Tony Zhou’s Every Frame a Painting series, this video essay dissects how Jones evolved from a promising young artist to an all-time master of visual comedy by closely and ceaselessly studying human behaviour through art and literature.

Director: Tony Zhou

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Anthropology
Infanticide

There is nothing so horrific as child murder, yet it’s ubiquitous in human history. What drives a parent to kill a baby?

Sandra Newman

Essay/Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison