The last kamikaze

8 minutes

‘The order could come at any moment’: two kamikaze pilots tell their story

‘Dying was the ultimate fulfillment of our duty.’ 

Takehiko Ena and Hisao Horiyama, respectively just 20 and 21 when they were drafted into the Japanese air force during the waning days of the Second World War, are two of the last living kamikaze pilots. One of several units known as ‘special attack units’ deployed by the Japanese military for suicide missions, kamikazes (translated as ‘divine wind’) were infamously sent to inflict as much damage on Allied warships as possible – and, as a consequence, kill themselves in the process. In The Last Kamikaze, the two would-be suicide pilots discuss how allegiance to their country, families and Emperor compelled them to accept their missions, and the two men, now in their 90s, recall their mixed feelings when they ultimately escaped with their lives shortly before Japan’s surrender.

Director: Irene C Herrera

Video/Knowledge

Models are always imperfect, and the ones we choose greatly shape our experience

3 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Bioethics

From identity politics to medicine, the DNA revolution demands a new bioethics

6 minutes

Video/Nature & Environment

In the murky waters of climate change, native fishers are among the most vulnerable

7 minutes

Essay/Consciousness & Altered States

What lurks beneath

The grand drama of Freud’s ideas has obscured the reality: every school of psychology needs a theory of the unconscious

Antonio Melechi

Idea/Neuroscience

Why is the brain prone to florid forms of confabulation?

Jules Montague

EXCLUSIVE
Video/Love & Friendship

Meeting your boyfriend’s family is hard. Agata must travel 3,000 miles. And she’s blind

13 minutes

Idea/Neuroscience

The brain-heart dialogue shows how racism hijacks perception

Manos Tsakiris

Essay/Neuroscience

Touched

We ride a stream of naked neurons, stripped of their sheaths, to the most blissful moments and deepest intimacies of life

Steven M Phelps

Video/Social Psychology

Never judge a book by its cover. But what about people and their faces?

12 minutes