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Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Mona Lisa selfie

1 minute

This woman has been in more selfies than anyone else in the world, and she’s still smiling

On permanent and prominent display at the Louvre Museum in Paris, Leonardo da Vinci’s enigmatic masterwork the Mona Lisa (1503-17) is protected by bulletproof glass, illuminated by a customised LED lamp and seen by some 6 million people a year, making it the most visited work of art in the world. In 2017, that means it’s also the most photographed. After all, in the selfie age, did you even experience it if you didn’t come away with your own quick snap? Assembled from hundreds of images collected from Instagram, Mona Lisa Selfie is a clever reflection on what a personal picture of a hyper-famous work of art means in the digital era.

Director: Daniel McKee


Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Anthropology
Infanticide

There is nothing so horrific as child murder, yet it’s ubiquitous in human history. What drives a parent to kill a baby?

Sandra Newman

Essay/Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison