Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Fluid dynamics

4 minutes

Aerodynamics researchers play with air and water to make amazing flying machines

In a small lab at NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, experimental physicist Leif Ristroph is attempting to fill the holes in our understanding of dynamic flight. Exploring the dynamics of both air and water, Ristroph and his team borrow from nature to investigate the physics of flight and create lightweight flying machines with simple motors. Eventually, Ristroph hopes that advances in the field of fluid dynamics could lead to smaller, more easily manoeuvrable aircrafts.

Director: Greg Stefano

Producer: Greg Stefano

Website: Cool Hunting

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/History of Science
Science is broken

Perverse incentives and the misuse of quantitative metrics have undermined the integrity of scientific research

Siddhartha Roy & Marc A Edwards

Essay/Physics
Why trees don’t ungrow

The cliché that life transcends the laws of thermodynamics is completely wrong. The truth is almost exactly the opposite

Jeremy England