Alaska: the nutrient cycle

14 minutes

After migrating thousands of miles to mate, chum salmon feed Alaska’s ecosystem

During breeding season, Alaska’s chum salmon abandon their instinct for survival and transform into creatures singularly focused on mating. After their perilous migrations to spawning grounds, frequently thousands of miles away, the salmon die, becoming food for animals of the air, land and water, or decomposing into the ground. Shot over three weeks, Paul Klaver’s breathtaking film combines time-lapse and conventional photography to chronicle the chum salmon’s annual journey through the Yukon River. The result is a powerful vision of the cyclical processes of vast ecosystems, and the inherent balance of the natural world.

Director: Paul Klaver

Video/Knowledge

Models are always imperfect, and the ones we choose greatly shape our experience

3 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Nature & Environment

In the murky waters of climate change, native fishers are among the most vulnerable

7 minutes

Video/Ecology & Environmental Sciences

The eerie otherworldliness of slow undersea life sped up to a human pace

5 minutes

Idea/Personality

Pigs, parrots and people: the problem of animal personality

Antone Martinho

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Cosmology

Echoes of a black hole

Ripples in space-time could herald the demise of general relativity and its replacement by a quantum theory of gravity

Sabine Hossenfelder

Video/Biology

Everything you always wanted to know about sex in space

4 minutes

Idea/History of Science

How many great minds does it take to invent a telescope?

Thony Christie

Essay/Physics

Minding matter

The closer you look, the more the materialist position in physics appears to rest on shaky metaphysical ground

Adam Frank