We will live again

12 minutes

At the Cryonics Institute, hope for the future is high, and death is put on ice

‘I think the future’s going to be kinder and gentler than the present.’

Located in an unassuming building outside Detroit, the Cryonics Institute houses more than 100 ‘metabolically challenged’ patients who died with the hope for another shot at life – even if it was a long one. In this short documentary, the US directors Myles Kane and Josh Koury astutely weave an inside look at the cryogenic freezing process with an examination of the ethical and moral controversies surrounding cryonics to provide a complex portrait of the institute’s leaders, who, like their patients, hope that future scientists might one day bring them back to life.

Director: Myles Kane, Josh Koury

Producer: Trisha Barkman

Website: Brooklyn Underground Films

Video/Life Stages

Harlem’s over-55s synchronised swimming team thinks ageing is better in the pool

4 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/History of Ideas

How did the 20th century’s most glamorous intellectual friendship go wrong?

3 minutes

Video/Demography & Migration

The island where 50 million crabs roam free and refugees are trapped in limbo

21 minutes

Video/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

Machine learning is important, but some AIs just want to have fun

57 minutes

Essay/Technology & the Self

Natural, shmatural

Mother Nature might be lovely, but moral she is not. She doesn’t love us or want what’s best for us

Molly Hodgdon

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

Quantum cryptography is unbreakable. So is human ingenuity

Joshua Holden

Video/Space Exploration

A tour of Mars assembled from NASA images reveals a wondrous but uninviting planet

5 minutes

Essay/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

Raising good robots

We already have a way to teach morals to alien intelligences: it's called parenting. Can we apply the same methods to robots?

Regina Rini

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

The body is the missing link for truly intelligent machines

Ben Medlock