We will live again

12 minutes

At the Cryonics Institute, hope for the future is high, and death is put on ice

‘I think the future’s going to be kinder and gentler than the present.’

Located in an unassuming building outside Detroit, the Cryonics Institute houses more than 100 ‘metabolically challenged’ patients who died with the hope for another shot at life – even if it was a long one. In this short documentary, the US directors Myles Kane and Josh Koury astutely weave an inside look at the cryogenic freezing process with an examination of the ethical and moral controversies surrounding cryonics to provide a complex portrait of the institute’s leaders, who, like their patients, hope that future scientists might one day bring them back to life.

Director: Myles Kane, Josh Koury

Producer: Trisha Barkman

Website: Brooklyn Underground Films

Video/Gender & Sexuality

How a dairy farmer preached radical self-acceptance to his gay son in the 1950s

4 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/History of Technology

Breakthroughs, quackery and strange beauty: the afterlife of outmoded medical devices

5 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

The body is the missing link for truly intelligent machines

Ben Medlock

Essay/History of Technology

Web of war

How the hair-trigger nuclear age and fears of Armageddon inspired visionary cold warriors to invent the internet

Sharon Weinberger

Video/Energy, Resources, & Sustainability

The case for making our homes out of trash – tradition and culture be damned

7 minutes

Idea/Technology & the Self

Why upgrading your brain could make you less human

Michael Bess

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Space Exploration

Whitey on Mars

Elon Musk and the rise of Silicon Valley's strange trickle-down science

Andrew Russell & Lee Vinsel

Video/Space Exploration

‘Space junk’ is a calamity in the making and a threat to anyone venturing off Earth

11 minutes