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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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The death of bees explained

6 minutes

Bees are dying. We don’t know exactly why, but our future depends on finding out

Colony collapse disorder (CCD), a name coined in 2006, describes a honeybee colony that has lost the vast majority of its worker bees, with only a queen, nurse bees and immature bees remaining. If CCD continues, it could be more than solely an animal ethics issue, but might be disastrous for us too: bees are workers who provide us with hundreds of billions of dollars in labour. We rely on honeybees for the fertilisation of some of our most vital crops. The Death of Bees Explained is an unsettling look at the factors that scientists believe might lead to CCD, and the gloomy future humanity could face if we can’t curb the damage soon.

Video by Kurzgesagt

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Biology
The minds of plants

From the memories of flowers to the sociability of trees, the cognitive capacities of our vegetal cousins are all around us

Laura Ruggles

Essay/Earth Science
Life goes deeper

The Earth is not a solid mass of rock: its hot, dark, fractured subsurface is home to weird and wonderful life forms

Gaetan Borgonie & Maggie Lau