Kant’s axe

2 minutes

Can a lie ever be noble? Why Kant believed even a life-saving fib was immoral

To the 18th-century German philosopher Immanuel Kant, the ethics of honesty were clear-cut: telling the truth, no matter the consequences, was a ‘categorical imperative’ – a moral duty. Taking chilling (and chilly) inspiration from Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining (1980), this brief animated snippet details Kant’s inflexible perspective on truth-telling, and its contrast with utilitarianism, which emphasises good outcomes over actions that are always right or wrong.

Video by BBC Radio 4

Script: Nigel Warburton

Animation: Andrew Park

Video/History of Technology

Breakthroughs, quackery and strange beauty: the afterlife of outmoded medical devices

5 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Neuroscience

A happy life is built on pleasures such as sex and food, but also company and variety

7 minutes

Essay/Fairness & Equality

In defence of hierarchy

As a society we have forgotten how to talk about the benefits of hierarchy, expertise and excellence. It's time we remembered

Stephen C Angle, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Julian Baggini and others

Video/Beauty & Aesthetics

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, which is the fairest rectangle of them all?

2 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Political Philosophy

Simone de Beauvoir’s political philosophy resonates today

Skye C Cleary

Essay/Political Philosophy

The last hollow laugh

Since Francis Fukuyama proclaimed ‘The End of History’ 25 years ago, he has been much maligned. His work now seems prophetic

Paul Sagar

Video/Values & Beliefs

How a millionaire traded his wealth for happiness – and a shoeshine box

4 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Philosophy of Mind

Panpsychism is crazy, but it’s also most probably true

Philip Goff