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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.
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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Avatar days

4 minutes

Elves and wizards go to work: a day in the life of online role-playing devotees

Many consider video games as mere escapism, but for a dedicated group of online role-playing gamers, virtual reality can merge with daily life in surprising and enlightening ways. As these gamers walk to work, or wait on line at the supermarket, they carry with them the fantastical creatures and mythological worlds of their video-game lives. In Avatar Days, this blending of worlds is made literal: using advanced 3D technologies and motion-capture animation, the film brings players’ in-game characters to life.

Director: Gavin Kelly

Producer: Dave Burke

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/Anthropology
Infanticide

There is nothing so horrific as child murder, yet it’s ubiquitous in human history. What drives a parent to kill a baby?

Sandra Newman

Essay/Rituals & Celebrations
Who first buried the dead?

Evidence of burial rites by the primitive, small-brained Homo naledi suggests that symbolic behaviour is very ancient indeed

Paige Madison