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Pouters

17 minutes

Paul Fegan

is a director and producer.

Published in association with
Scottish Documentary Institute
an Aeon Partner

Heated rivalries and (pigeon) sex: the passionate world of Scottish doo fleein’

The sport of competitive pigeon flying (or ‘doo fleein’, in the parlance of its practitioners) is a centuries-old Scottish tradition, and the pursuit of no more than about 1,000 Scots. It requires an expertise in all things pigeon, but essentially boils down to luring an opponent’s birds into a sexual rendezvous with your own pigeons. Pouters follows two longtime rivals, Rab and Danny, as they compete for doo fleein’ supremacy among bleak Glasgow apartment tower blocks.

Director: Paul Fegan

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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