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Music of India

17 minutes

Melody, rhythm and piety: the rich forms and meanings of Indian classical music

Produced by the Indian government-run Films Division in 1966, this vintage short explores the North Indian Hindustani and South Indian Carnatic styles of Indian classical music, which diverged around the 15th and 16th centuries but share common roots in Hindu musical traditions and ancient texts. Accompanied by performances from top Indian classical musicians of the time, Music of India examines the form’s essential elements, including its deeply spiritual character, and the concepts of ‘raga’ – a musical piece’s central, often partially improvised, melodic form – and ‘tala’ – its recurring rhythmic pattern.

Director: A Bhaskar Rao

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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