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Persistence of vision III

2 minutes

Why they’re dancing at the world’s northernmost medieval cathedral

Nidaros Cathedral in the Norwegian city of Trondheim is the northernmost medieval cathedral in the world, and it has an enduring history of destruction and restoration. This centuries-long perseverance is reexamined by the filmmaker Ismael Sanz-Pena in his short animation Persistence of Vision III. By playfully reorganising parts of a single image of the cathedral’s façade, Sanz-Pena transforms the building’s solemn religious imagery into a flipbook-style sequence that has saints, bishops and other holy people dancing.

Video by Ismael Sanz-Pena

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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