The ray-cat solution

14 minutes

Could the weirdest solution to the problem of nuclear waste also be the best?

In 1981, the US Department of Energy and the civil engineering company Bechtel Corp assembled a task force to help tackle the problem of how to warn future humans to stay away from radioactive nuclear waste sites thousands of years into the future. Perhaps the strangest solution came from the French author Françoise Bastide and the Italian semiologist Paolo Fabbri, who proposed genetically engineering cats to change colour in response to radiation, and creating a mythology of danger around those cats. An exploration of unusually creative problem-solving, the French director Benjamin Huguet’s film probes how the once-obscure, decades-old ‘ray-cat solution’ has recently found new life.

Director: Benjamin Huguet

ORIGINAL
Video/Neuroscience

A happy life is built on pleasures such as sex and food, but also company and variety

7 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Beauty & Aesthetics

Mirror, mirror, on the wall, which is the fairest rectangle of them all?

2 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

The body is the missing link for truly intelligent machines

Ben Medlock

Essay/History of Technology

Web of war

How the hair-trigger nuclear age and fears of Armageddon inspired visionary cold warriors to invent the internet

Sharon Weinberger

Video/Energy, Resources, & Sustainability

The case for making our homes out of trash – tradition and culture be damned

7 minutes

Idea/Technology & the Self

Why upgrading your brain could make you less human

Michael Bess

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Space Exploration

Whitey on Mars

Elon Musk and the rise of Silicon Valley's strange trickle-down science

Andrew Russell & Lee Vinsel

Video/Space Exploration

‘Space junk’ is a calamity in the making and a threat to anyone venturing off Earth

11 minutes