The ray-cat solution

14 minutes

Could the weirdest solution to the problem of nuclear waste also be the best?

In 1981, the US Department of Energy and the civil engineering company Bechtel Corp assembled a task force to help tackle the problem of how to warn future humans to stay away from radioactive nuclear waste sites thousands of years into the future. Perhaps the strangest solution came from the French author Françoise Bastide and the Italian semiologist Paolo Fabbri, who proposed genetically engineering cats to change colour in response to radiation, and creating a mythology of danger around those cats. An exploration of unusually creative problem-solving, the French director Benjamin Huguet’s film probes how the once-obscure, decades-old ‘ray-cat solution’ has recently found new life.

Director: Benjamin Huguet

Video/History

The amazing and awful outcome of releasing over a million balloons into the sky

7 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Neuroscience

Psychiatry is due for a revolution in diagnosis and treatment through brain science

4 minutes

Video/Physics

How the ‘identity agnostic’ neutrino exists in three states all at once

3 minutes

Video/History of Technology

What does innovation sound like? For a century, typewriters chattered an evolving story

21 minutes

Essay/Technology & the Self

Natural, shmatural

Mother Nature might be lovely, but moral she is not. She doesn’t love us or want what’s best for us

Molly Hodgdon

Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

Quantum cryptography is unbreakable. So is human ingenuity

Joshua Holden

Video/Human Enhancement

It takes a careful blend of science, craft and compassion to make a prosthetic eye

6 minutes

Essay/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

Raising good robots

We already have a way to teach morals to alien intelligences: it's called parenting. Can we apply the same methods to robots?

Regina Rini

Idea/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

The body is the missing link for truly intelligent machines

Ben Medlock