The ray-cat solution

14 minutes

Could the weirdest solution to the problem of nuclear waste also be the best?

In 1981, the US Department of Energy and the civil engineering company Bechtel Corp assembled a task force to help tackle the problem of how to warn future humans to stay away from radioactive nuclear waste sites thousands of years into the future. Perhaps the strangest solution came from the French author Françoise Bastide and the Italian semiologist Paolo Fabbri, who proposed genetically engineering cats to change colour in response to radiation, and creating a mythology of danger around those cats. An exploration of unusually creative problem-solving, the French director Benjamin Huguet’s film probes how the once-obscure, decades-old ‘ray-cat solution’ has recently found new life.

Director: Benjamin Huguet

Video/Cities

A poetic tour through Detroit's abandoned, ghostly Packard Automotive Plant

7 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/History of Science

‘I could not but wonder at it’: history’s first glimpses into the microbial world

7 minutes

Video/Space Exploration

‘Space junk’ is a calamity in the making and a threat to anyone venturing off Earth

11 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Future of Technology

How the dearly departed could come back to life – digitally

Muhammad A Ahmad

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Future of Technology

Crimes of the future

Predictive policing uses algorithms to analyse data and cut crime. But does it really work, and should it be trusted?

Sidney Perkowitz

Video/Making

Trapped, boiled, devoured: how to eat well in the wild

7 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Internet & Communication

Only governments can safeguard the openness of the internet

Rufus Pollock

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/History of Technology

Buck to the future

He’s a forgotten hippie idol, a sage of 1960s counterculture. What can we learn from Bucky Fuller’s faith in technology?

Samanth Subramanian