All creatures great and small

3 minutes

Forget space – the unknown worlds in pond scum are rich with life’s secrets

During the 1970s, Elizabeth Blackburn discovered something fundamentally important about life, uncovering the function of telomeres, which cap strands of DNA and protect chromosomes. She would go on to earn a Nobel Prize for her work in 2009. In this sprightly animated video from Nature, Blackburn recounts how a love of all living creatures – and especially the frequently overlooked, microscopic ones – inspired her curiosity and her work.

Video by Dog & Rabbit

Video/Art

Born of pain, filled with power – a teenage girl’s art that confronts in order to heal

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/History of Ideas

Can the problem of induction save Anthony’s dismal dating life?

6 minutes

Video/History

Albania built 750,000 bunkers for a war that never came. Now what?

24 minutes

Idea/Ecology & Environmental Sciences

Polar bears need to be fat, and they can’t be without sea ice

Thea Bechshoft

Essay/Epidemiology

Who names diseases?

Swine Flu, Naples Soldier, Ebola. Disease names express fear, create stigma and distract attention. Can they be improved?

Laura Spinney

Video/Mathematics

Getting down with squares – the dance styles of geometry

6 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Space Exploration

Space exploration is still the brightest hope-bringer we have

Earle Kyle

Video/Evolution

Watch as the whale becomes itself: slowly, slowly, from land to sea, through deep time

10 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/History of Science

The cosmology of Poe

Drawing on intuition, Edgar Allan Poe offered some remarkably prescient ideas about the universe in his poem 'Eureka'

Paul Halpern