All creatures great and small

3 minutes

Forget space – the unknown worlds in pond scum are rich with life’s secrets

During the 1970s, Elizabeth Blackburn discovered something fundamentally important about life, uncovering the function of telomeres, which cap strands of DNA and protect chromosomes. She would go on to earn a Nobel Prize for her work in 2009. In this sprightly animated video from Nature, Blackburn recounts how a love of all living creatures – and especially the frequently overlooked, microscopic ones – inspired her curiosity and her work.

Video by Dog & Rabbit

Video/History

The amazing and awful outcome of releasing over a million balloons into the sky

7 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Meaning & the Good Life

How the Stoic embrace of death can help us get a grip on life

5 minutes

Video/Physics

How the ‘identity agnostic’ neutrino exists in three states all at once

3 minutes

Essay/Physics

Operation: neutrino

How the neutrino went from ghost particle to vital physics tool – a tale of bombs, espionage and subtle flavours

David Kaiser

Idea/Astronomy

What high-speed astronomy can tell us about the galactic zoo

Christopher Kochanek

Video/History of Science

In 1938, a fish thought extinct for 65 million years resurfaced, nearly unchanged

7 minutes

Video/Physics

If life feels out of balance, don’t worry – there’s always symmetry below the surface

4 minutes

Idea/Anthropology

It’s not that your teeth are too big: your jaw is too small

Peter Ungar

Essay/Quantum Theory

Quantum common sense

Despite its confounding reputation, quantum mechanics both guides and helps explain human intuition

Philip Ball