The plant family tree

9 minutes

How our developing understanding of plants changed our knowledge of life itself

With some 7 million dried plant specimens, the herbarium at Kew Gardens in London is one of the largest collections of its kind in the world. Building on the Linnaean system, through Darwin to DNA, scientists there have traced the relationship between plant life-forms and the timeline of their development over the ages – from algae to mosses to flowers. While the plant family tree is thought to be 95 per cent complete, this short documentary reveals that continuing to study plants gives us an important framework for asking questions about how our ecosystems actually work.

Video by Lonelyleap

Video/Sports & Games

Even before kick-off, Milan’s San Siro stadium is an awe-inducing spectacle

6 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Neurodiversity

How the ‘Island of the Colourblind’ made Oliver Sacks rethink ’normal’

6 minutes

Video/Astronomy

The plodding photon, or how the speed of light looks sluggish on a galactic scale

45 minutes

Essay/Mathematics

How to play mathematics

The world is full of mundane, meek, unconscious things embodying fiendishly complex mathematics. What can we learn from them?

Margaret Wertheim

Idea/History of Science

The missing fossils matter as much as the ones we have found

Adrian Currie & Derek Turner

Video/Evolution

A cut-throat case of evolutionary backstabbing in the Peruvian rainforest

3 minutes

Essay/Physics

This granular life

That the world is not solid but made up of tiny particles is a very ancient insight. Is it humanity’s greatest idea?

Carlo Rovelli

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Physics

Why we can stop worrying and love the particle accelerator

Joel Frohlich