Cyborg Foundation

4 minutes

How the world’s first ‘recognised cyborg’ senses colour through sound

Born with a rare condition that causes complete colourblindness, the UK-born, Catalan-raised artist Neil Harbisson helped develop the ‘eyeborg’ in 2004 – an antenna that converts colours into sounds – and had the device implanted in his skull. The eyeborg has actually altered his brain chemistry, allowing him to hear colours in his dreams, and thus creating an undeniable union between the technology and his mind. In 2010, Harbisson co-founded the Cyborg Foundation, a non-profit that defends ‘cyborg rights’ and helps people extend their senses and fulfill their cybernetic dreams.

Director: Rafel Duran Torrent

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