In your head

4 minutes

Interactive biofeedback sensors may be the future of treating chronic pain

For those with chronic pain, the most basic movements can be unbearable. Some patients even develop kinesiophobia – a fear of, or aversion to, movement. Using interactive digital interfaces, the chronic pain sufferer Diane Gromala, professor of interactive arts and technology at Simon Fraser University in Canada, is developing new ways to help alleviate symptoms that could serve as a supplement or alternative to pharmaceuticals. Through a biofeedback system, Gromala’s interfaces track users’ physiological responses to different movements and mental states.

Director: Petra Epperlein, Mike Tucker

Producer: Petra Epperlein, Mike Tucker

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