In your head

4 minutes

Interactive biofeedback sensors may be the future of treating chronic pain

For those with chronic pain, the most basic movements can be unbearable. Some patients even develop kinesiophobia – a fear of, or aversion to, movement. Using interactive digital interfaces, the chronic pain sufferer Diane Gromala, professor of interactive arts and technology at Simon Fraser University in Canada, is developing new ways to help alleviate symptoms that could serve as a supplement or alternative to pharmaceuticals. Through a biofeedback system, Gromala’s interfaces track users’ physiological responses to different movements and mental states.

Director: Petra Epperlein, Mike Tucker

Producer: Petra Epperlein, Mike Tucker

Video/Music

Melody, rhythm and piety: the rich forms and meanings of Indian classical music

17 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Childhood & Adolescence

Why the ‘exotic and strange’ world of childhood is ripe for horror

5 minutes

Idea/Medicine

There is nothing inevitable or natural about chronic disease

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Essay/Illness & Disease

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Melinda Wenner Moyer

EXCLUSIVE
Video/Addiction

Can writing an 11,000-page autobiographical thesis cure addiction?

16 minutes

Essay/Illness & Disease

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Idea/Illness & Disease

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Drew Smith

Video/Mind & Body

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9 minutes