Japanese handmade paper of Kyoto Kurotani

6 minutes

Not all paper is created equal: an 800-year-old tradition of making it by hand

A tradition dating back to the 16th century, making paper by hand is still central to life in the village of Kurotani in the Japanese prefecture of Kyoto. The durable and versatile material, called washi, is crafted in a meticulous process that includes harvesting a trio of plants, preparing and soaking the raw materials, and forming sheets on bamboo screens. This soothing observational short documentary follows the process from harvest to the final decorative touches.

Director: Kuroyanagi Takashi

Website: Polar Design

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