Farewell: etaoin shrdlu

29 minutes

The last day of hot metal press before computers come in at The New York Times

Once called the ‘eighth wonder of the world’ by Thomas Edison, Linotype typecasting machines revolutionised publishing when they were invented in 1886, and remained the industry standard for nearly a century after. The first commercially successful mechanical typesetter, the Linotype significantly sped up the printing process, allowing for larger and more local daily newspapers. In Farewell, etaoin shrdlu (the latter portion of the title taken from the nonsense words created by running your fingers down the letters of the machine’s first two rows), the former New York Times proofreader David Loeb Weiss bids a loving farewell to the Linotype by chronicling its final day of use at the Times on 1 July 1978. An evenhanded treatment of the unremitting march of technological progress, Weiss’s film about an outmoded craft is stylistically vintage yet also immediate in its investigation of modernity.

Director: David Loeb Weiss

Producer: Carl Schlesinger

Video/Cities

A poetic tour through Detroit's abandoned, ghostly Packard Automotive Plant

7 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/History of Science

‘I could not but wonder at it’: history’s first glimpses into the microbial world

7 minutes

Video/Music

Melody, rhythm and piety: the rich forms and meanings of Indian classical music

17 minutes

Essay/Cosmopolitanism

This is your morning

I left the US, the land of my birth, sickened by racial injustice. But the return to a homeland is not a simple matter

Enuma Okoro

Idea/Death

Ghosts and ghouls haunt the living with a message about life

Thomas W Laqueur

Video/Digital Culture

A transfixing audiovisual dive into varieties of emergence

4 minutes

Idea/Art

Why the dandy is a subversive work of public art

Tara Isabella Burton

Essay/Digital Culture

Shame on you

Unburdening ourselves online can feel radical and liberating. But is baring and sharing all as emancipatory as it seems?

Firmin deBrabander