Marvin Chun: decoding the mind

4 minutes

What will we do when neuroimaging allows us to reconstruct dreams and memories?

For millennia, people have sought to unlock the secrets hidden in the minds of others, as well as the mysteries of their own subconscious. Today, emerging technologies such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), which allow researchers to read, interpret and map neural activity, offer unprecedented access to the inner workings of our brains as they engage in thinking, sensing and experiencing emotions. So now that we might have these long-desired mind-penetrating powers, what will we do with them? In this cleverly animated video from the Future of Storytelling, the Yale University psychologist and neurobiologist Marvin Chun discusses the state of neuroimaging, and its mind-boggling potential for transforming science, medicine and human self-understanding.

Director: Matt Smithson

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