Marathon

9 minutes

With inspiring perseverance, Julio juggles late work nights with elite marathon training

Working until the early morning hours in a Manhattan restaurant kitchen, Julio Sauce still finds the energy to train for and compete each year in the New York City Marathon – a gruelling 26-mile endurance test through the five boroughs. After moving to New York from his native Ecuador in search of job opportunities in 1994, Sauce was inspired to give the race a shot after watching it on television. Since finishing in 2,800th place in his first year, he has trained alongside other working-class immigrants to become an elite long-distance runner. Moving between Sauce’s day-to-day life – working, training and spending time with his family – and marathon day, when he hopes to finish at the top of his age group among New Yorkers, Marathon is a richly moving portrait of the US immigrant experience.

Directors: Kate McLean, Theo Rigby

Website: iNation Media

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