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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Le clitoris

3 minutes

Meet the lucky little organ that is uniquely dedicated to pleasure

A small organ with an enormous number of nerve endings but a single mission – pleasure – the clitoris has historically been the source of much confusion and controversy. Debated, interpreted and reinterpreted (mostly by men), this organ has been viewed as everything from a fertility enhancer to entirely useless, and to this day remains a much misunderstood part of female anatomy. In her short animation Le Clitoris, the French-Canadian filmmaker Lori Malépart-Traversy offers an entertaining analysis and celebration of the clitoris, separating the facts from the many myths.

Director: Lori Malépart-Traversy

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

Essay/
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Bonnie Evans

Essay/
Gender & Sexuality
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Misogynists are fascinated by the idea that human brains are biologically male or female. But they’ve got the science wrong

Emily Willingham