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Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

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Nora Ephron on Crazy Salad

6 minutes

On breasts, beauty and being a female journalist in the women’s movement

‘It’s okay being a woman now. I like it. Try it some time.’

The US writer Nora Ephron, who died in 2012, is probably best known for her prolific career in Hollywood, which included writing and directing successful romantic comedies such as Sleepless in Seattle (1993) and You’ve Got Mail (1998), among many others. However, Ephron first broke through as a journalist, writing for the New York Post and covering women’s issues for Esquire. In this characteristically honest and witty interview from 1975, revitalised by PBS’s Blank on Blank series, Ephron discusses her relationship with the women’s movement, including why her writings on it could never be ‘objective’, and why beauty and breast size matter.

Director: Patrick Smith

Producer: David Gerlach

Support Aeon

Ideas can change the world

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview.

But we can’t do it without you.

Aeon is a registered charity committed to the spread of knowledge and a cosmopolitan worldview. Our mission is to create a sanctuary online for serious thinking.

No ads, no paywall, no clickbait – just thought-provoking ideas from the world’s leading thinkers, free to all. But we can’t do it without you.

Become a Friend for $5 a month or Make a one-off donation

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