Nora Ephron on Crazy Salad

6 minutes

On breasts, beauty and being a female journalist in the women’s movement

‘It’s okay being a woman now. I like it. Try it some time.’

The US writer Nora Ephron, who died in 2012, is probably best known for her prolific career in Hollywood, which included writing and directing successful romantic comedies such as Sleepless in Seattle (1993) and You’ve Got Mail (1998), among many others. However, Ephron first broke through as a journalist, writing for the New York Post and covering women’s issues for Esquire. In this characteristically honest and witty interview from 1975, revitalised by PBS’s Blank on Blank series, Ephron discusses her relationship with the women’s movement, including why her writings on it could never be ‘objective’, and why beauty and breast size matter.

Director: Patrick Smith

Producer: David Gerlach

Video/Music

Melody, rhythm and piety: the rich forms and meanings of Indian classical music

17 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Childhood & Adolescence

Why the ‘exotic and strange’ world of childhood is ripe for horror

5 minutes

Video/Nature & Environment

A Herculean fish and the fight against a $6 billion mega-dam project in Alaska

25 minutes

Essay/Family Life

How to be a patriarch

His duties are many, his challenges weighty, but his glory can be great. A guide to family management, by a Roman nobleman

Marcus Sidonius Falx & Jerry Toner

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Poverty & Development

Want to reduce drug use? Listen to women drug users

Kasia Malinowska & Bethany Medley

Video/Fairness & Equality

How the one-child policy created a Chinese underclass of 13 million people with no rights

15 minutes

Essay/Education

Child’s play

The authoritative statement of scientific method derives from a surprising place — early 20th-century child psychology

Henry Cowles

Idea/Politics & Government

Sovereignty can be bought and sold like a commodity

Steven Press