The little deputy

9 minutes

A boy wants to wear a red dress in a photo with his dad, but doesn’t quite dare

In The Little Deputy, the Canadian director Trevor Anderson revisits a memory from a rare father-son outing in 1986, when a shopping mall photographer at a Wild West-themed photo booth handed him a sparkly red dress. It’s uncertain whether the photographer really mistook the boy for a girl, or instead sensed something about him that no one else quite realised. But, even then, Trevor knew that as an adult he would want to have that picture of himself in the dress. He didn’t dare, though, so years later, he finds a way to fulfill that wish.

Inventive, moving and darkly funny, Anderson’s short film about being gay but not quite out was a festival favourite in 2015, appearing at the Sundance Film Festival and AFI Fest, among many others.

Director: Trevor Anderson

Producer: Blake McWilliam

Website: Dirty City Films

Video/Anthropology

How footprints trapped in time unlocked a mystery of early hominids

8 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Mathematics

A brilliant ‘geometric ballet’ of sound, shape and symmetry on the theme of 180°

5 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Social Psychology

The seductive lie of ‘Patient Zero’ and the outbreak narrative

Leyla Mei

Video/Gender & Sexuality

In southern Mexico, a long-acknowledged ‘third gender’ is not masculine or feminine

9 minutes

Essay/Neuroscience

Living in the now

She can paint, but not name a painting; learn new music without knowing a tune. Lonni Sue is teaching us much about memory.

Michael D Lemonick

Video/Neurodiversity

How the ‘Island of the Colourblind’ made Oliver Sacks rethink ’normal’

6 minutes

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Idea/Cognition & Intelligence

On shared false memories: what lies behind the Mandela effect

Caitlin Aamodt

volume_up
play_arrow
pause
Essay/Self-Improvement

The self-help game

Millions believe that pop psychology can change their tennis skills, their love life or their moods. Are they all wrong?

Rami Gabriel