Feynman’s building blocks of thermodynamics

3 minutes

Energy is like children’s toys: often hiding out of sight, but never actually lost

Energy can’t be created or destroyed, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t end up hiding in some surprising places. Aided by Cubism-inflected animation and a clever analogy thought up by Richard Feynman, the chemist and broadcaster Andrea Sella, professor of inorganic chemistry at University College London, explains how scientists can infer the distribution of energy ‘in cunning ways’ without actually observing it.

Director: Rosanna Wan

Producer: Ed Prosser

Website: The Royal Institution

Video/Life Stages

Harlem’s over-55s synchronised swimming team thinks ageing is better in the pool

4 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Beauty & Aesthetics

Why do audiences thrill to the negative emotions of horror fiction?

6 minutes

Video/Demography & Migration

The island where 50 million crabs roam free and refugees are trapped in limbo

21 minutes

Essay/Quantum Theory

Quantum common sense

Despite its confounding reputation, quantum mechanics both guides and helps explain human intuition

Philip Ball

Video/Cosmology

The Sun – our steady, reliable companion – tells a very different story up close

4 minutes

Idea/Physics

The idea of creating a new universe in the lab is no joke

Zeeya Merali

Video/Physics

The mathematics of music means piano strings can never be in perfect harmony

4 minutes

Essay/Computing & Artificial Intelligence

fAIth

The most avid believers in artificial intelligence are aggressively secular – yet their language is eerily religious. Why?

Beth Singler

Idea/Biology

Bad mothers and why they make a difference to cheetah survival

Anne Hilborn