Feynman’s building blocks of thermodynamics

3 minutes

Energy is like children’s toys: often hiding out of sight, but never actually lost

Energy can’t be created or destroyed, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t end up hiding in some surprising places. Aided by Cubism-inflected animation and a clever analogy thought up by Richard Feynman, the chemist and broadcaster Andrea Sella, professor of inorganic chemistry at University College London, explains how scientists can infer the distribution of energy ‘in cunning ways’ without actually observing it.

Director: Rosanna Wan

Producer: Ed Prosser

Website: The Royal Institution

Video/Art

‘This is post-traumatic growth’: how one artist painted over her rape

4 minutes

ORIGINAL
Video/Ethics

If soldiers act with unjust aggression they are as culpable as civilian criminals

6 minutes

Video/Human Evolution

Why do fear, cold and sublime feelings all provoke the same response in our skin?

3 minutes

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Idea/Cosmology

Our Universe is too vast for even the most imaginative sci-fi

Michael Strauss

Video/Astronomy

The plodding photon, or how the speed of light looks sluggish on a galactic scale

45 minutes

Essay/Mathematics

How to play mathematics

The world is full of mundane, meek, unconscious things embodying fiendishly complex mathematics. What can we learn from them?

Margaret Wertheim

Video/Evolution

A cut-throat case of evolutionary backstabbing in the Peruvian rainforest

3 minutes

Essay/Physics

This granular life

That the world is not solid but made up of tiny particles is a very ancient insight. Is it humanity’s greatest idea?

Carlo Rovelli

Idea/History of Science

The missing fossils matter as much as the ones we have found

Adrian Currie & Derek Turner