Cosmopolitanism


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Beauty and aesthetics Bioethics Comparative philosophy Cosmopolitanism Death Ethics History of ideas Knowledge Logic and probability Meaning and the good life Metaphysics Philosophy of language Philosophy of mind Philosophy of religion Philosophy of science Political philosophy Thinkers and theories Values and beliefs Virtues and vices

Armed Armenian revolutionaries, Turkey, 1906. Photo courtesy of B Dickson/Royal Geographical Society/Getty

Essay/
Nations and empires
Roving revolutionaries

Moving between the Russian, Iranian and Young Turk revolutions, cosmopolitan Armenians helped usher in the 20th century

Houri Berberian

With the appearance of the first rays of the sun from Cerro Huantajaya in Alto Hospicio, northern Chile, people celebrate the arrival of the Aymara New Year, Machaq Mara, and the arrival of new energies. Photo courtesy Gobierno Regional de Tarapacá/Flickr

Idea/
Cognition and intelligence
What happens to cognitive diversity when everyone is more WEIRD?

Kensy Cooperrider

New York, 1955. Photo by Elliott Erwitt/Magnum
Essay/
Political philosophy
A history of alienation

In the postwar period it was understood to be the fundamental malaise of modern life. Why aren’t we ‘alienated’ any more?

Martin Jay

Katrina Esau, one of the last remaining speakers of a Khoisan language that was thought extinct nearly 40 years ago, teaches her native tongue to a group of school children in Upington, South Africa on 21 September 2015. Photo by Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty

Essay/
Philosophy of language
The death of languages

Endangered languages have sentimental value, it’s true, but are there good philosophical reasons to preserve them?

Rebecca Roache

Photo by Bloomberg/Getty

Essay/
Nations and empires
Why nation-states are good

The nation-state remains the best foundation for capitalism, and hyper-globalisation risks destroying it

Dani Rodrik

Reading in a tea shop in Istanbul. Photo by Louis Grandadam/Getty
Essay/
Stories and literature
Readers of the world unite

How markets, Marx, and provincial elites created world literature to fight both empire and nationalism

Martin Puchner

France, 1950. Photo by Mark Kauffman/LIFE/Getty

Essay/
Nations and empires
Les Anglo-Saxons

Not just American or British, the Anglo-Saxon is a mirror to Frenchness: the country’s alter-ego and most feared enemy

Emile Chabal

Room for all; a typical day in Hyde Park, central London. Photo by Peter Dench/Getty
Essay/
Cities
Common ground

When we think of urban public space in terms of competing rights, we create a battleground. Is there a better way to share?

Farhan Samanani

Storm clouds gather above ships waiting to dock in Singapore. Photo by Edgar Su/Reuters

Essay/
Global history
What is global history now?

Historians cheered globalism with work about cosmopolitans and border-crossing, but the power of place never went away

Jeremy Adelman

A grandmother and granddaughter from Cape Verde. Photo by O. Louis Mazzatenta/National Geographic
Essay/
Demography and migration
The future is mixed-race

And so is the past. Migration and mingling are essential to human success in the past, the present and into the future

Scott Solomon

At a crossroads in the Maitama district of Abuja, Nigeria. Photo by Kassim Braimah
Essay/
Cosmopolitanism
This is your morning

I left the US, the land of my birth, sickened by racial injustice. But the return to a homeland is not a simple matter

Enuma Okoro

Billionaire Lui Che Woo, chairman and founder of Galaxy Entertainment Group Ltd with an assistant in Hong Kong, China, 3 March 2016. Photo by Billy H.C. Kwok/Bloomberg/Getty
Essay/
Work
Trust me with your money

It takes diplomacy, anthropology and psychology to serve the world’s super-rich. But only trust opens their purse strings

Brooke Harrington