Cognition and intelligence


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Cognition and intelligence
It’s hard to fool a nose

Theories of perception are heavily tilted to the visual: we have much to learn from our surprisingly acute sense of smell

Ann-Sophie Barwich

Why did the woman cross the road? Photo by Harry Gruyaert/Magnum

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Cognition and intelligence
You are the world

Are your decisions made by your brain, or via the experience of the world relative to your body? A dialogue on consciousness

Tim Parks & Riccardo Manzotti

At the World Chess Championships in London, 2013. Photo by Andrew Testa/Panos

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Cognition and intelligence
Concentrate!

The challenge of chess – learning how to hold complexity in mind and still make good decisions – is also the challenge of life

Jonathan Rowson

Photo by Elliott Erwitt/Magnum

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Animals and humans
Canine exceptionalism

Trainers working with dogs every day have documented extraordinary talents and skills. Will science ever catch up?

Jessica Hekman

Speakers corner, London, 1978. Photo by Rudolf Dietrich/ullstein bild/Getty

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Knowledge
Mistaken

Assuming that another person’s opinions are immune from criticism is not a marker of respect. It is, in fact, dehumanising

Daniel Ward

Photo by Jorge Sanz/SOPA Images/LightRocket Getty

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Animals and humans
What do mirror tests test?

Chimps, dolphins and elephants pass, dogs and cats don’t. Is the mirror test a reliable mark of self-awareness?

Virginia Morell

Photo by Vincent J Musi/National Geographic

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Animals and humans
The pointing ape

How a chimpanzee named Clint trained a psychologist to question human exceptionalism and reconsider the intelligence of apes

David Leavens

At the Remembrance Day ceremony at Old City Hall in Toronto, 11 November 2014. Photo by Mark Blinch/Reuters

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Human evolution
United by feelings

Universal emotions are the deep engine of human consciousness and the basis of our profound affinity with other animals

Stephen T Asma & Rami Gabriel

Photo by Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

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Neuroscience
Now you see it

Our brains predict the outcomes of our actions, shaping reality into what we expect. That’s why we see what we believe

Daniel Yon

Photo by SSPL/NRM/Getty

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Pleasure and pain
Catching desires

That drink, that cigarette, that dance: wanting things is highly contagious. Can you be immunised against the infection?

Bence Nanay

The German artist Gerhard Richter with a panel from his 4900 Colours (2008) at the Serpentine Gallery in London. The seemingly arbitrary distribution of colours was generated using a specially developed computer program. Photo by Shaun Curry/Getty

Idea/
Art
If machines want to make art, will humans understand it?

Rui Penha & Miguel Carvalhais

Photo by Stephan Vanfleteren/Panos

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Neuroscience
The interoceptive turn

The science of how we sense ourselves from within, including our bodily states, is creating a radical picture of selfhood

Noga Arikha

Unreliable evidence. Photo by Xavier Zimbardo/Getty

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Knowledge
Knowledge is crude

Far from being a touchstone of the truth, knowledge is a stone-age concept that harms our dealings with the modern world

David Papineau

Déesse V Nine Goodbye Kisses by Delphine Lebourgeois

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Cognition and intelligence
Women’s minds matter

Feminists never bought the idea of the computational mind set free from its body. Cognitive science is finally catching up

Sally Davies

Pixie (left) and Zhanna. Photo courtesy Laurette Larocque

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Animals and humans
Green-eyed pets

Commonsense tells us that both dogs and cats experience jealousy. Are we being anthropomorphic or can we know for sure?

Paul Thagard

Boston Marathon winner Yuki Kawauchi runs to work in his home town of Kuki, Japan. Photograph © Shiho Fukada/The New York Times/Redux/Headpress

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Philosophy of mind
Thinking on your feet

Don’t just do it, think about it too: how Gilbert Ryle’s philosophy of mind can help athletes teach themselves to improve

Josh Habgood-Coote